New year starter package discount

VictorianNew year, new hobby? If you’ve wondered who your ancestors are but have never been quite sure how to begin uncovering your roots, now’s a great time to start because we are offering a 20% discount on our starter research package until the end of February! We can help to begin your family tree; this great value package includes an initial consultation, a minimum of 10 hours research to establish leads on both maternal and paternal sides, images of any records discovered, advice on next steps and a detailed report of what we find to get your family story started. All you have to do is contact us before 28th February 2016 to qualify for your discount. The geneological research offered by Your Family Stories goes that extra mile; we place our discoveries about your ancestors in their social and historical context, presenting you with a captivating written family history.

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Census Celebrities: Karl Marx

Karl MarxAs well as giving us a wealth of information on our own ancestors, the census returns can give us a snapshot of life for some of the UK or US’s more famous inhabitants throughout the 1800s. The census returns recorded everyone living in the country on the night it was taken – even royalty were obliged to complete the census! Recently we found Karl Marx on the 1871 UK census, living in London at Maitland Park Road, St Pancras with his wife and daughters, and one servant. He describes himself as an author.

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Some aristocracy at last!

My husband has always liked to tease me about my passion for genealogy and although indulging me with his attention from time to time has never really been remotely interested in my family history discoveries, not even about his own roots. So of course, it’s typical that it is in his family tree that I have first come across some real English nobility. One of his branches can be traced back to the Praters of Warwickshire, who held, among many other manors, Nunney Castle in Somerset during the 1500s and 1600s, until they lost it to the Roundheads during the Civil War. Cromwell’s forces blasted a hole in one of the walls and it was never lived in again.  Ok, there are fifteen geneFamily historyrations between my husband and Richard Prater Esquire, but nonetheless, there’s a castle in the family.

Of course, once you come across one noble family suddenly they’re everywhere, as they all intermarried. Being desceneded, however remotely, from the Praters means that other powerful medieval and tudor families feature in my husband’s tree: the Carews, the de la Mares, the Conweys, the Throckmortons. Distant ancestors have served at the courts of Henry VIII and Edward III, and even played host for the night to King Charles I before he lost his head. Suddenly my husband, born and bred in New Zealand, is more English than I am…

Think you might have some aristocratic blood in your family tree? There are a number of useful websites for tracing your noble roots. Try http://www.burkes-peerage.net or the Tudor Roll of Blood Royal & Plantagenet Roll of Blood Royal on http://www.ancestry.com for starters.

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20% off our starter research packages!

family history genealogy ancestryIf you’ve wondered who your ancestors are but have never been quite sure how to begin uncovering your roots, now’s a great time to start because we are offering a 20% discount on our starter research package until the end of September! We can help to begin your family tree; this great value package includes an initial consultation, a minimum of 10 hours research to establish leads on both maternal and paternal sides, images of any records discovered, advice on next steps and a detailed report of what we find to get your family story started. All you have to do is contact us before 1st October 2014 to qualify for your discount. The geneological research offered by Your Family Stories goes that extra mile; we place our discoveries about your ancestors in their social and historical context, presenting you with a captivating written family history.

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Census Celebrities: Charlotte & Emily Bronte

Genealogy ResearchHere’s one for the literature fans. England’s 1841 census shows Charlotte Bronte, the author of Jane Eyre, working as a governess not far from her home in Yorkshire, a career she pursued from 1839 to 1841 before any of the Bronte sisters published their work. Her younger sisters Emily and Anne Bronte however are found living at Haworth Parsonage with their father, Patrick Bronte, and their Aunt Elizabeth Bramwell.

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Ten new celebrities for WDYTYA

The ten famous faces lined up for this year’s new series of Who Do You Think You Are? have been revealed. The celebrities set to uncover their genealogical stories include Harry Potter author J.K.Rowling, who will explore her French ancestry, Gold medal athlete Sebastian Coe, whose roots span the globe from Jamaica to the USA, actress Emilia Fox who is set to discover her theatrical lineage, and EastEnders’ June Brown (Dot Cotton), who at 84 will be the oldest person ever to have enjoyed the Who Do You Think You Are? experience. Find out more at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/news/newseriesrevealed

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New site for those tracing Irish roots

Findmypast Ireland, a joint venture between findmypast and Eneclann, launched last month, offering the most extensive collection of Irish land records available anywhere online – a valuable resource for those 80 million people worldwide who claim Irish ancestry (me included!). The site carries over 4 million records, the most detailed collection of Irish records ever seen in one place. These include land records, directories, wills, obituaries, gravestone inscriptions and marriages. The collection includes the exclusive publication of the Landed Estates Court records, a crucial resource for the mid- to late-19th century, which includes details of over 500,000 tenants on Irish estates. Find out more at http://www.findmypast.ie/

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